7 things to do in Hull

7 things to do in Hull

Whether you’re a Hull resident or just visiting, the city has a rich abundance of things to do. If you’re looking for something to occupy the kids, or perhaps something a bit more grown-up, you really are spoilt for choice. We’ve added a quick list below to get you started!

1. Hull’s historic centre

One of the few areas of the city to have escaped the wrath of the bombing raids of World War Two. Strolling around the Old Town, you’ll come across stunning examples of Stuart and Georgian architecture as well as picturesque waterfronts, local businesses, and taverns oozing with character.

Admire Hull’s magnificent Minster, have a Yorkshire brew at The Lion and Key, search for England’s tiniest window at The George Hotel, and stumble onto Prince Street, a stunning collection of pastel-coloured Georgian residences – Notting Hill, take note.

2. Truck Theatre

What is this? If it weren’t for Time Out, this wonderful theatre would not be here. “Half-formed theatrical company seeks another half,” founder Mike Bradwell ran an advertisement in a magazine in 1971. Dramatists like John Godber have served as creative directors at the house, making it an important cultural institution in the region. The Liverpool Scene was brought to Yorkshire via its pioneering dramas.

Why go? To witness fantastic programmes of one-of-a-kind, dynamic shows that are fiercely local in character.

3. The Deep

What is this? When the futuristic-looking aquarium opened in East Yorkshire in 2002, it had a huge influence on the community. The sleek, angular structure designed by Sir Terry Farrell revitalised an abandoned industrial site on the city’s estuary. People from all across the nation came to view it, many of whom had never been to Hull before. More than a decade later, it remains a beloved attraction in the city, housing 3,500 sea creatures, including seven different kinds of sharks.

Why go? Endless Oceans has loggerhead turtles, nurse sharks, green sawfish, and stingrays, among other species. Take a peek at the Gentoo penguins in the Kingdom of Ice Aquarium.

4. Ye Olde White Heart

What is this? Oak-panelled walls, sagging beams, inglenook fireplaces, and stained-glass windows are some of the architectural elements that embellish this drinking cave in Old Town. Its crooked walls are dripping with history. The ‘Plotting Room’ of the Palace of Westminster, where the English Civil War was sparked in 1642, was a wood-clad marvel of space.
Why go? To sip one of their great cask ales and feel the weight of history on your shoulders. Check out the human skull behind the bar and marvel at their extensive selection of malt whiskies.

5. The New Adelphi Club

What is this? Even though it seems to be a run-down terrace home in a residential neighbourhood to the north of the city, this rickety building is a well-known music venue. Since 1984, Radiohead, Stone Roses, Primal Scream, Oasis, and Pulp have played here. Local Hull band Housemartins signed their first record contract in the itty-bitty performance space.

Why go? In addition to fantastic live performances by both national and international stars, the city has incredibly amazing club nights almost daily. This is one of the city’s most significant locations.

6. Wilberforce House Museum

What is this? The Hull MP and abolitionist William Wilberforce was born in this stunning red brick structure. The major rooms of the museum contain displays that focus on the Trans Atlantic slave trade, its eventual abolition, and the contribution that William Wilberforce had in bringing an end to slavery in Parliament. In addition, there are displays on West African culture and slavery in the current world.

Why go? In the Old Town, there are a plethora of good museums to visit, but this one stands out. Exhibitions in Hull show that the city has played a more significant role in British history than many people realise.

7. Queen’s Gardens

What is this? For more than a century, the port of Hull had been filled in and turned into a series of gardens. With its fountains, duck ponds, flowering trees, and colourful flower beds, it’s now a peaceful haven in the heart of the city. Many of Hull’s yearly events, such as the Jazz Festival, are held here.

Why go? Robinson Crusoe made sail from Hull before becoming lost on a desert island, and you can locate the Wilberforce memorial and the Robinson Crusoe plaque here. After setting off from Hull, the imaginary traveller ended up on an isolated island. It’s the ideal spot to enjoy a 99-er and a picnic in the sun.

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